K as in Knife

Unknown quantities, resonant frequencies, moving parts, and everything in between. Chosen and obsessively annotated by C. Mason Wells.

New here? Hit random and go exploring.

c.mason.wells [at] gmail.com
twitter.com/cmasonwells
Michael O’Donoghue and Frank Springer, “The Adventures of Phoebe Zeit-Geist” (1968)

One of the earliest works from O’Donoghue — the king of dark comedy and a personal hero — is this damsel-in-distress parody replete with Nazis, lesbian assassins, and (as above) our intrepid heroine getting killed halfway through the story. This is a fine example of O’Donoghue’s risk-taking, combative, take-no-prisoners sense of humor, which still seems fresh today. He went on to become a defining voice of early SNL and the National Lampoon, for whom he wrote features like “The Vietnamese Baby Book.” Michael O’Donoghue and Frank Springer, “The Adventures of Phoebe Zeit-Geist” (1968)

One of the earliest works from O’Donoghue — the king of dark comedy and a personal hero — is this damsel-in-distress parody replete with Nazis, lesbian assassins, and (as above) our intrepid heroine getting killed halfway through the story. This is a fine example of O’Donoghue’s risk-taking, combative, take-no-prisoners sense of humor, which still seems fresh today. He went on to become a defining voice of early SNL and the National Lampoon, for whom he wrote features like “The Vietnamese Baby Book.”

Michael O’Donoghue and Frank Springer, “The Adventures of Phoebe Zeit-Geist” (1968) One of the earliest works from O’Donoghue — the king of dark comedy and a personal hero — is this damsel-in-distress parody replete with Nazis, lesbian assassins, and (as above) our intrepid heroine getting killed halfway through the story. This is a fine example of O’Donoghue’s risk-taking, combative, take-no-prisoners sense of humor, which still seems fresh today. He went on to become a defining voice of early SNL and the National Lampoon, for whom he wrote features like “The Vietnamese Baby Book.”